Sunday, December 14, 2008

Review – “Field of Blood” by Eric Wilson

Judas hung himself in a place known as the Akeldama or Field of Blood.

But what if his death didn't end his betrayal?

What if his tainted blood seeped deep into the earth, into burial caves, causing a counterfeit resurrection of the dead?

Gina Lazarescu, a Romanian girl with a scarred past, has no idea she is being sought by the undead. The Collectors, those released from the Akeldama, feed on souls and human blood. But there are also the Nistarim, those who rose from their graves in the shadow of the Nazarene's crucifixion--and they still walk among us, immortal, left to protect mankind. Gina realizes her future will depend on her understanding of the past, yet how can she protect herself from Collectors who have already died once but still live?
Field of Blood is the first in a planned trilogy of urban fantasy/horror novels called the Jerusalem Undead. When a construction crew accidentally uncovers the entrance to a tomb in Jerusalem, a group of eighteen Collectors are able to resurrect the bones of the buried into flesh and blood undead. They begin a search for any one of the thirty six Nistarim, for if they are able to kill just one, they will eventually have dominion over mankind.

While the Collectors are the equivalent of remorseless psychopaths, once they inhabit human bodies their nature is tempered by the original personality of their hosts. Wilson does an admirable job of showing the adaptation of these early post-Christian characters as they adapt to modern times and language.

Field of Blood draws heavily upon Old Testament, Christian and Jewish lore in it’s depiction of the relationships between the forces that are aligned against one another. These details are seemlessly revealed through character interaction as the story unfolds without subjecting the reader to tedious infodumps and add a dignity and richness to the narrative.

All of the main characters have mysterious pasts that are only partially explained, drawing you in and demanding answers. We follow Gina from a young girl under her mothers’ superstitious protection in eighties Romania into the late nineties after they have escaped to America and Gina has exerted her independence. Gina is mystically marked, with a special destiny related to the Nistarim. The nature of this destiny has been suppressed by her mother who has her own secrets and agenda and this destiny is only partially revealed to Gina by Cal, a man from her mothers past, who reappears in her present and who may or may not be a Nistarim himself.

Alternating POV’s allow us to see events through the eyes of the gruesome Collectors as they exert their sociopathic tendencies and search for Gina; as well as through secondary characters that orbit the affairs of the Collectors and the Nistarim. Each side is able to claim small victories against the other before Field of Blood concludes. However the table has only been set and the main course must wait for further volumes in the series.

Field of Blood is a dark, supernatural journey featuring vampires and champions born from the roots of Christian mythology. Suspenseful and mysterious, it offers a unique interpretation of the vampire trope and the eternal battle of good versus evil.

Read an excerpt of Chapter 1.

Thomas Nelson
Published: October 2008
ISBN #: 9781595544582
Format: Trade paperback
Pages: 406

Jerusalem’s Undead Trilogy

  1. Field of Blood (2008)
  2. Haunt of Jackals (July 2009)
  3. Valley of Bones (April 2010)

View the book trailer . . .


  1. I may actually read a christian ficion novel. I'm a little excited and a little hesitant at the same time.

  2. Hi Allie, I have heard this referred to as Christian fiction and in general I shy away from that genre, but when I decided to read and review this I looked at it from the perspective of a fiction book that used thoroughly researched detail as backstory. Really no different then historical novels or fantasies based on any other cultural or religious affiliation. I didn't perceive any intrusive or "message" elements to the story and found it to be very engaging. Really no different in concept then many paranormals that feature good versus evil themes with demons and nephilim, fallen angels etc which all share a Christian foundation and mythos.

  3. Wow. I must say, I'm humbled by your positive review of the book. Thank you. I'm even now finishing the edits for Haunt of Jackals, and planning the last book, Valley of Bones. Happy reading!


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